Why You Need A Delaware Certificate Of Incorporation Apostille

Updated: Dec 31, 2021


Choosing the right state to incorporate a company out of is probably one of the most important business decisions a company owner must make. When starting a new company, the state that you incorporate your business out of is just as important as your business offering. Most new company owners don’t realize this and often deprive themselves of certain corporate benefits.


Many companies choose to incorporate out of the state of Delaware due to its many advantages. One of the main advantages is the tax benefits offered by the state. A corporation registered in the state of Delaware that does not conduct business in that state is not subjected to state-imposed income taxes. Although it’s not the only reason companies incorporate out of Delaware, this reason alone is why many companies choose Delaware when it comes to incorporating.


Another reason many companies prefer Delaware as the state to incorporate is that it allows the identity of the company's Directors to remain private. This is because the names of the

company’s Directors are not required to be listed on the Certificate of Incorporation. In addition to this, should the name of an officer or director change, the company does not have to file an amendment with the Division of Corporation to update that information.


The aforementioned are two of the main reason Delaware is the state of choice when it comes to incorporating a company; however, there’s much more involved in forming a Delaware corporation. This article discusses one of the most important steps in becoming a legitimately recognized Delaware corporation, and how American Apostille & Notary Services can assist with its completion.


Before a company can be recognized as a Delaware corporation, it must receive an approved Certificate of Incorporation from the Delaware Division of Corporations. A Delaware Certificate of Incorporation is the foundation upon which a Delaware corporation is built. Without this very important document, your company will not be considered a valid Delaware company. Please be aware that a Certificate of Incorporation and Articles of Incorporation in some states such as Delaware mean the same thing. There is no difference between these two documents.


Once you have completed the necessary steps for completing your Delaware Certificate of

Incorporation, you want to obtain a Delaware Certificate of Incorporation Apostille. A Delaware Certificate of Incorporation Apostille is a one-page document issued under the Great Seal of Delaware by the Secretary of State that is attached to a certified copy of your company’s Certificate of Incorporation. This is extremely important if your company is going to be conducting business abroad.


Many foreign countries will require a Delaware Certificate of Incorporation Apostille in order to conduct business in their region. Apostilles are an internationally recognized method of

legitimizing documents as a result o the Hague Convention of 1961. By attaching an Apostille to a notarized or certified copy of your Certificate of Incorporation, the document will be recognized as legitimate by all countries party to the Hague Convention. If a country is not a party to the Hague Convention, American Apostille & Notary Services can still obtain authentication and legalization of necessary corporate documents.


Whether you have an existing or newly formed Delaware corporation, a Delaware Certificate of Incorporation Apostille is necessary if you are planning to conduct any business abroad. This process can seem a bit intimidating, which is why American Apostille & Notary Services is here to assist with the certification of your Delaware Certificate of Incorporation. We work closely with the Delaware Secretary of State and the Delaware Division of Corporations to ensure all of our client documents are accurately completed, and in line with the requirements of the state of Delaware. Contact us today at 848-467-7740 to complete your company’s Delaware Certificate of Incorporation Apostille.

21 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All