top of page

International Human Remains Transport Apostille

Updated: Oct 11, 2022


One of the most difficult things you will ever go through is losing a loved one, which is also the most stressful occurrence in life. All things soft, beautiful, and bright would be buried with a person who meant a great deal to us. However, in addition to the potential for a serious emotional crisis, the event frequently results in a variety of issues that you must deal with. The expenses and bureaucracy involved in transporting a relative's remains for burial overseas can make a tragic situation even worse if they pass away in another country. The following article discusses which documents require an International Human Remains Transport Apostille when transporting the remains of a loved one from abroad.


Transporting Human Remains Overseas


  1. The funeral home or you must deliver the required documentation listed to the consulate.

  2. The Consulate will ask the appropriate foreign authorities for permission to allow the remains to pass the country's border for burial.

  3. Following the granting of the aforementioned Burial Permit, the Consulate will issue a unique document in the deceased's name and deliver it to the funeral home.

  4. An international human remains transport apostille or legalization of the issued document is essential for the transportation of human remains.

  5. One or two certified copies of the death certificate (depending on the country) must also be presented with an International Human Remains Transport Apostille. The specified apostille certification must be obtained from the office of the secretary of state in the state where the death took place.

  6. Certified translation of the death certificate into the language of the destination country (Please Note: The vast majority of countries demand that the translation also be validated by an apostille). To verify this, you must contact the consulate for that country.

  7. An official document (certified by the appropriate authorities) along with a translation and an apostilled affidavit from the County Department of Health that:


● "There were no epidemic diseases in the County at the time of Mr./Mrs. ____’s death"


● "The laws of the State where the mortuary is located were maintained while embalming the body"


● "There was no infectious disease that the deceased died of"


Please Note: Different states issue various versions of the aforementioned affidavits, but no matter how the document appears, the abovementioned statements must be included.


If the deceased person was cremated, the funeral home's Certificate of Cremation and Sealing must be notarized, verified, apostilled, and legally translated.


The paperwork must abide by specific laws governing the transportation of human remains internationally as well as laws governing both bodies and cremated remains.


Due to the aforementioned, families who are grieving a relative who has passed away abroad frequently face the unexpected situation of needing to find knowledgeable professionals who can assist them with the preparation of their International Human Remains Transport Apostille for documents in accordance with the particular requirements of foreign authorities. Failure to submit the necessary paperwork will make it impossible to bring the deceased person's body home.


apostille & notary services help


At American Apostille & Notary Services, we are committed to helping you move past your loss by doing our best to assist with any document preparation related to transporting the remains of your loved one from abroad. We understand the burden of your loss. We'll guide you through the legalization and translation processes of your International Human Remains Transport Apostilles and make sure that the remains of your loved one cross international borders in a safe and secure manner.


If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us at (848) 467-7740. We are always available to listen, answer, and assist with any questions you may have regarding the international transporting of your loved one's remains.

22 views0 comments
bottom of page